Home | Artists | Studios | Recording | Band Toolbox | Blog |  Live TV | Video |  Radio | Gallery | Studio Directory | Who We Are | Links | Contact Us 

ONLINE GLOSSARY

A E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T      Add New      Display All     Search
Total Number of Terms : 1363
 
Da Capo -- Da capo (Italian: from the beginning), abbreviated to the letters D.C. at the end of a piece of music or a section of it, means that it should be played or sung again from the beginning (De capo al fine) or from the beginning up to the sign (Da capo al segno). A da capo aria, often found in the later baroque period, is an aria in three sections, the third an ornamented repetition of the first
 
Da Capo Al Fine -- The sign at the end of a piece saying to begin over from the beginning up to where it says "Fine"
 
Deceptive Cadence -- A chord progression that seems to lead to resolving itself on the final chord; but does not
 
Decrescendo -- Decrescendo (Italian: growing less) is used as a direction to performers, meaning becoming softer
 
Decrescendo -- Gradually getting softer
 
Development -- Where the musical themes and melodies are developed, written in sonata form
 
Diminuendo -- Diminuendo (Italian: becoming less) is used as a direction to performers to play softer
 
Dissonance -- Chords or groups of notes that don't go well together or clash in some way, creating an unstable sound and in need of resolution
 
Dissonance -- Harsh, discordant, and lack of harmony. Also a chord that sounds incomplete until it resolves itself on a harmonious chord
 
Divertessement -- The French word divertissement (= Italian: divertimento) is used in English principally to indicate the additional dance entertainment that is often a part of classical ballet
 
Divertimento -- A divertimento is an instrumental composition intended for entertainment, usually in a number of movements. The term is used particularly in the second half of the 18th century. Haydn described his first string quartets as Divertimenti and the title is also used by Mozart and other composers of the period
 
Divertissement -- The French word divertissement (= Italian: divertimento) is used in English principally to indicate the additional dance entertainment that is often a part of classical ballet
 
Double Bass -- The double bass is the largest and lowest of the instruments of the string section of the orchestra. It has generally four or five strings and its music sounds an octave (eight notes) lower than it is written
 
Double Bass -- The use of two bass drums with a drum set. Double bass drumming can also be played with a twin or double bass pedal and just one bass drum
 
Double Bassoon -- A double bassoon plays an octave lower than the bassoon
 
Downbeat -- The "main" pulse as it relates to the rest of the measure. If you have 8 eighth notes in a bar of 4/4 time, beats 1, 2, 3 and 4 would be considered the downbeat. The "and" of 1, "and" of 2, "and" of 3, and "and" of 4 would be the upbeat. Also, the first beat of the measure
 
Drone -- Dull, monotonous tone such as a humming or buzzing sound. Also a bass note held under a melody
 
Drum -- The form of drum generally found in the orchestra is the kettledrum or, in incorrect Italian, timpani, since the Italian singular timpano seldom appears in English usage
 
Duet -- A duet is a piece of music written for two performers. On the piano such a piece would involve two players on one instrument
 
Duo -- A duo is a piece of music for two performers. Written for the piano such a piece would need two performers and two pianos
 
Dynamics -- Dynamics are the levels of sound, loud or soft, in a piece of music
 
Dynamics -- playing soft to loud (and visa versa) on a music instrument.
 
Home | Artists | Studios | Recording | Band Toolbox | Blog | Live TV | Video |  Radio | Gallery | Studio Directory | Who We Are | Links | Contact Us 
Bookmark HothouseStudios.com

Hothouse Music Group
2003-2009 Updated: January 20, 2009 12:49pm • Privacy Policy Terms and Conditions Sitemap